Tuesday, September 06, 2005

Hokies 20, Wolfpack 16


Safety Aaron Rouse (left) is congrulated by linebacker James Anderson after making his second interception against N.C. State Sunday night.

To read an official recap of the game, click here.

Quick thoughts though, on:

Marcus Vick: The redshirt junior played in my mind an average game, throwing for only 108 yards and one touchdown. Yet, he maintained certain intangibles and got the job done. He showed good poise in the pocket, and it was good to see him play mistake-free, committing no turnovers. This area was without a doubt the biggest key for the Hokies in a game that was all about team field position and time of possesion. In looking at his passing performance, Vick only went for 10-21, and at times his accuracy looked shaky. However his second half touchdown lob to wideout David Clowney was picture perfect, and in the end was the game-winner. Add to his performance how he conjured up a few good runs and you can give the kid major respect. Tons of potential lies in him, all of which is just waiting to be tapped.

Pass defense: #36 came to play. Despite getting ran over in the first half by N.C. State's Darrell Blackman, junior safety Aaron Rouse came back strong to pick off N.C. State Jay Davis quarterback twice, including one on the last play of the game that gave Virginia Tech the win. Factoring in the combination of cornerback Jimmy Williams into the picture, the pass coverage for the Hokies was impenetrable, as they didn't allow the Wolfpack to score once through the air.

Tackling: Jimmy Williams put some serious licks on the Wolfpack, and the kid is a cornerback. The first big hit was a sack on quarterback Jay Davis, followed by another hit on running back Darrell Blackman in the backfield, and lastly another on a N.C. State receiver whose name I forget. All in all, #2 definitely lived up to the preseason hype with his performance.

Defensive end Chris Ellis almost outdid Jimmy with his second half hit, in which he snapped back Blackman and bodyslammed him to the ground. Afterwards he proceeded to 'incidentally' step on Blackman, an act which looked almost as painful as the tackle.

Outside linebacker James Anderson also made a notable tackle -- one that looked excruciatingly painful -- for N.C. State. In tackling Blackman, It looked like Anderson broke the N.C. State running back's neck, in which he snapped him back in an extremely awkward motion. A facemask was called on this play, yet when the replay was shown, I did not manage to see it. However, in mentioning Anderson's tackling, that's a part of his game he definitely needs to work on. He missed two big tackles in the flats that N.C. State capitalized on, striding for huge gains after his mistakes.

ESPN 2's Announcers: Though it wasn't Lee Corso or Kirk Herbstreit in the booth calling the game, I really wish it was. The no-name announcers who were calling it play-by-play were not great by any means. While hosting several friends over, they called them "boring" to which I instantly agreed. Also I could not get over the fact how they kept calling, on several occasion Marcus Vick by the name of MICHAEL. So, Dear ESPN, Marcus Vick plays for Virginia Tech, Michael does not. Hire people who know this.

Commercials during the game: In our Blacksburg area in which the game was shown. There was one commercial that had some humor that was not thought out at all, and as a result, it was humorous. The commercial was for a local dealership in the area selling Motorcycles, and ATVs and such. Basically their campaign message surrounding the commercial was "Gas prices are incredibly high, so come on down and buy a bike!" So after seeing this, the thought was, "I'm heated because I have to pay extra money for gas. So let me go drop a couple grand on a Harley!" What logic.

That's pretty much my two cents for week one; all in all what a great way to start off the new season. Looking forward to see us stomp on Duke next week, but until then...

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